Muscle of the Day: Sartorius

A great muscle to study, causing pain after thigh injury, can be stretched like the normal quad stretch.  Its sometimes mis-diagnosed as a quad injury.

Origin: Anterior Superior Iliac Spine

Insertion: Proximal Tibia

Action: Flexes, Abducts and Laterally Rotates Hip. Flexes Leg at Knee

The Sartorius, the longest muscle in the body, is narrow and ribbon-like; it arises by tendinous fibers from the anterior superior iliac spine and the upper half of the notch below it. It passes obliquely across the upper and anterior part of the thigh, from the lateral to the medial side of the limb, then descends vertically, as far as the medial side of the knee, passing behind the medial condyle of the femur to end in a tendon. This curves obliquely forward and expands into a broad aponeurosis, which is inserted, in front of the Gracilis and Semitendinous, into the upper part of the medial surface of the body of the tibia, nearly as far forward as the anterior crest. The upper part of the aponeurosis is curved backward over the upper edge of the tendon of the Gracilis so as to be inserted behind it. An offset, from its upper margin, blends with the capsule of the knee-joint, and another from its lower border, with the fascia on the medial side of the leg.

Henry Gray, “Anatomy of the Human Body”

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